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Ubuntu Pro is free for personal use! - Page 3
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Ubuntu Pro is free for personal use!

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Comments

  • @emperor said:
    So what is the point in keeping LTS version after PRO goes live?

    Well, we'll see what happens in practice, but the difference is that the LTS version with 5 years of support is free for everyone (no questions asked)

    The Pro version will be based on the LTS version but will have 10 years of support and will cost something from day 1 (if not for personal use)

    My guess that the two will exist in parallel because they're aimed at different user groups

  • defaultdefault Member
    edited October 2022

    @angstrom said:

    @emperor said:
    So what is the point in keeping LTS version after PRO goes live?

    Well, we'll see what happens in practice, but the difference is that the LTS version with 5 years of support is free for everyone (no questions asked)

    The Pro version will be based on the LTS version but will have 10 years of support and will cost something from day 1 (if not for personal use)

    My guess that the two will exist in parallel because they're aimed at different user groups

    From what I can see, Ubuntu Pro is basically LTS (Long Term Support for 5 years) + ESM (Extended Security Maintenance for another 5 years) + Livepatch (Maintenance of system through patches, no reboot required, 10 years).

    Hopefully they will not go greedy and discontinue LTS later on. Personally I could see them do this, to then add all Ubuntu versions into extended long term support (as ESM) through Pro.

  • @default said:

    @angstrom said:

    @emperor said:
    So what is the point in keeping LTS version after PRO goes live?

    Well, we'll see what happens in practice, but the difference is that the LTS version with 5 years of support is free for everyone (no questions asked)

    The Pro version will be based on the LTS version but will have 10 years of support and will cost something from day 1 (if not for personal use)

    My guess that the two will exist in parallel because they're aimed at different user groups

    From what I can see, Ubuntu Pro is basically LTS (Long Term Support for 5 years) + ESM (Extended Security Maintenance for another 5 years) + Livepatch (Maintenance of system through patches, no reboot required, 10 years).

    Hopefully they will not go greedy and discontinue LTS later on. Personally I could see them do this, to then add all Ubuntu versions into extended long term support (as ESM) through Pro.

    I agree that it's not inconceivable that they would do this at some point, but I don't think that it'll happen in the near future, because it would have a dramatic (negative) effect on the Ubuntu community/ecosystem

  • @default said:
    Call me insane, but this is just traditional corporatism greed to make money later from something developed for free by others, previously made out of passion and love for technology.

    Yeah! Fuck people who want to work for a living doing something they love to do!

    Thanked by 2niranjan martheen
  • YmpkerYmpker Member
    edited October 2022

    So it begins..

    IMG_20221009_173117

    Thanked by 2FatGrizzly default
  • emgemg Member
    edited October 2022

    Sometimes it starts with a corporate partnership. It is like a big fish tasting the little fish before the big fish gobbles it up.

    Off Topic:
    Does that padlock image imply high security?

    The spray paint section at the local Home Depot is usually locked with that kind of padlock. It is faster to pick the lock than find an associate in the store to open it for us.

  • vyas11vyas11 Member
    edited October 2022

    I had written a few thoughts here in this discussion that Microsoft is a potential suitor for Ubuntu, things seem to be heading in that direction - before AWS or Alibaba attempt a takeover. (starting with letter A, as an example of possible buyers)

    Canonical had revenues of around 150 Mn US Dollars last year, with over 500 employees. In April 2022 they were predicting 175 MN US Dollars for current year.

    A 12 to 15 X valuation, even in present times, seems like a prudent and reasonable multiple. Which puts the price tag for Canonical between 1.8 and 2 Billion US dollars.

    As a reference point, Red Hat was purchased for 34 Billion US dollars, with 3.4 Bn USD in revenues. This was in 2019 during better (pre recession/ pre covid times)

  • @vyas11 said:
    I had written a few thoughts here in this discussion that Microsoft is a potential suitor for Ubuntu, things seem to be heading in that direction - before AWS or Alibaba attempt a takeover. (starting with letter A, as an example of possible buyers)

    Canonical had revenues of around 150 Mn US Dollars last year, with over 500 employees. In April 2022 they were predicting 175 MN US Dollars for current year.

    A 12 to 15 X valuation, even in present times, seems like a prudent and reasonable multiple. Which puts the price tag for Canonical between 1.8 and 2 Billion US dollars.

    As a reference point, Red Hat was purchased for 34 Billion US dollars, with 3.4 Bn USD in revenues. This was in 2019 during better (pre recession/ pre covid times)

    25 years ago, 100% Ubuntu would be acquired by Microsoft. To be shuttered. This isn't Ballmer's Microsoft anymore.

    Also, sounds like a ton of lost SQL server licenses if they are free on Ubuntu.

  • vyas11vyas11 Member
    edited October 2022

    @TimboJones

    You have your reasons for your position, I have my reasons for mine. I have mentioned other suitors as well- AWS or AliBaba cloud etc.or even a hardware maker. Appeal to potential buyer is hardly the Ubuntu brand, but equally or more important is the huge community and the ecosystem that comes with it.

    Canonical have been eyeing an IPO since 2019, not that might get pushed back to end 2023 if not sooner. The company has investors and stakeholders who may have overstayed their investment cycle. I understand Mark S has invested tens if millions of own money too.
    All said,
    I see no harm in agreeing to disagree and this is my last comment on the topic

  • @Ympker said:
    So it begins..

    IMG_20221009_173117

    Honest question. Are there any actual upsides to using MS SQL instead, say, mysql? I know I could google it but maybe someone has some firsthand experience.

  • @TimboJones said: sounds like a ton of lost SQL server licenses if they are free on Ubuntu

    Nah the licensing cost is identical regardless of the OS.

    @serv_ee said: actual upsides to using MS SQL instead, say, MySQL

    Legacy and tool ecosystem. Nobody is going to migrate years' worth of development projects into another DB just for fun, and there are tools developed for MS SQL that probably won't be ported to other DB.

    There are performance differences depending on the workload and the DBA skill, but you can't really say "alright, let's migrate to another DB to squeeze some more performance" unless throwing another rack can't solve it.

    Thanked by 1TimboJones
  • tjntjn Member

    @martheen said:
    There are performance differences depending on the workload and the DBA skill, but you can't really say "alright, let's migrate to another DB to squeeze some more performance" unless throwing another rack can't solve it.

    +1

    Also support, insurance requirements, and compliance.

    MSSQL isn't bad if I'm honest, it's just horrendously expensive.

  • EnvidaEnvida Member
    edited October 2022

    @devp said:

    @Envida said:

    @devp said:

    @tjn said: Those that complain about Canonical "ruining" Ubuntu or prioritising corporate profits over open-source always make laugh.

    Ubuntu before Canonical was way better than what that is today in terms of performance. Most earlier contributions made to the core structure remains intact with minor updates.

    There was no Ubuntu before Canonical. Canonical Ltd. was founded by Mark Shuttleworth in March 2004 to promote Ubuntu and market its commercial interests/projects. They have been responsible for releasing every version since the initial 4.10 Warty Warthog version back in October 2004. So, Ubuntu before Canonical cannot be way better as it wasn't a thing. ;) >:)

    I found an older archive of ubuntu.com from archive.org . Canonical was marketing ubuntu related products and services while sponsering as they say. They were involved in core development of the project as that was happening from community members though they were sponsering the project. Later Canonical get more involved in decision making and enteripse services rather than providing community services to the enterprise as that was mentioned on the front page of ubuntu from archieve. Earlier ubuntu was FOSS model based which no longer in existense when canonical starts searching for sponsers and investors themselves years earlier.

    Here is the link

    • Ubuntu.com archieve mirror from october 15 2004.

    Still wasn't a thing. I think you are misunderstanding how sponsoring a project works. Canonical didn't just hand over a load of cash/resources and say 'right lads and lasses, crack on. We'll market whatever you make'.

    They would have very clear goals, specifications and targets from the get go. Yes things related to the Ubuntu distro, its community and their relationship it Canonical have changed over time but the community is still involved with development and there has never been an Ubuntu without Canonical calling the shots. Its priorities just changed. Ubuntu has never claimed to be 100% FOSS, mainly because of proprietary drivers it includes - though even the default Debian image won't be 100% FOSS from version 12 and will include some vendor BLOBs, as has been pointed out further up. I personally don't mind that.

    Your point about Canonical seeking investors is irrelevant, unless I'm not understanding it properly - most businesses raise capital somehow.

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