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MXroute alternative in Europe?
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MXroute alternative in Europe?

I use MXroute for personal domains but a colleague wants to set up something for a side project that will be a company and wants email hosted in Europe. Is there something like MXroute in Europe where you paid only for the storage?

Thank

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Comments

  • No, but maybe @jar can help to get a server set up?

  • @ascicode said:
    No, but maybe @jar can help to get a server set up?

    IT's for the GDPR, so the company must be European I think

  • @vitobotta said:

    @ascicode said:
    No, but maybe @jar can help to get a server set up?

    IT's for the GDPR, so the company must be European I think

    Well, has it to be a selfhosted server, or a company with a reputation?

    There are some email hosters in some locations, but they provide only a bare maximum of maybe 20GB.

  • tjntjn Member

    Does your friend's new company need more than 1 account/mailbox?
    MS365 and Google Workspace are pretty cheap for business use these days, coming in at just €5/month - which for something that's pretty invaluable is kind of a bargain.

  • MXRoute is a US based company, but most of their servers are based in Germany.

  • He was going with Google but I told him about mxroute, I was kinda suggesting it because the pricing is better. Since it’s a new thing I don’t think he needs much storage or accounts after all

  • @vitobotta said:
    He was going with Google but I told him about mxroute, I was kinda suggesting it because the pricing is better. Since it’s a new thing I don’t think he needs much storage or accounts after all

    I use Mxroute for my personal sites. But for business, I prefer Google Workspace.
    1. Better Spam Filters.
    2. Easier for collaboration. For example, you can hire a VA from anywhere and don't have to train them to use the Google Workspace system. Docs and Drive are included + easy to use

  • is mxrout not recommended for business applications? and if so, why not?

  • bikegremlinbikegremlin Member
    edited August 19

    @hyperblast said:
    is mxrout not recommended for business applications? and if so, why not?

    In my experience, MXroute is among the most reliable email solutions.

    It is not for sending mass-emails (limit is 300 per hour).

    And, apparently, it is not GDPR-compliant, 'cause idiots wrote & are enforcing that law (and many idiots are very eager to comply, without being forced).

  • @bikegremlin said:

    @hyperblast said:
    is mxrout not recommended for business applications? and if so, why not?

    In my experience, MXroute is among the most reliable email solutions.

    It is not for sending mass-emails (limit is 300 per hour).

    And, apparently, it is not GDPR-compliant, 'cause idiots wrote & are enforcing that law (and many idiots are very eager to comply, without being forced).

    EUdiots?!!

  • jarjar Member, Patron Provider

    @hyperblast said:
    is mxrout not recommended for business applications? and if so, why not?

    It's fine but not intentionally GDPR compliant, and you know how things go otherwise: If you have more than $300,000,000,000 in the bank you can have 15% bad reviews but if you have $50,000 in the bank you can't have 1% bad reviews or you're too risky (not sure how that logic works but that's my impression of the internet).

  • vyas11vyas11 Member

    I recall from a past discussion here that you use Zoho. What did you opt for your own case? Why not consider them? Or inbox dot eu ?

    Cheers

  • @jar said:

    @hyperblast said:
    is mxrout not recommended for business applications? and if so, why not?

    It's fine but not intentionally GDPR compliant, and you know how things go otherwise: If you have more than $300,000,000,000 in the bank you can have 15% bad reviews but if you have $50,000 in the bank you can't have 1% bad reviews or you're too risky (not sure how that logic works but that's my impression of the internet).

    Exactly.

    If there's one positive thing about my country not being a part of EU, it's the damn GDPR.

    I mean: I care about security and privacy. As far as I know and can tell, MXroute is a trustworthy email provider. It just hasn't (publicly, "officially") ticked all the GDPR-required nonsense catches and gotchas.

    The funniest thing are the people who are in the EU and are very happy to comply with the GDPR, considering it to be the best thing ever - while carrying their smartphones everywhere, having profiles on social networks, paying with cards (and considering cash payments to be "barbaric" and "obsolete"), etc.

    Lawyers and "GDPR-cookie providers" are making a ton of money, while small, independent business websites are fucked, so I suppose the law works as it was (really) intended...

  • YmpkerYmpker Member

    I was going to write a rant about GDPR, but I am only repeating myself. Basically, what @bikegremlin said.

  • @jar said:

    @hyperblast said:
    is mxrout not recommended for business applications? and if so, why not?

    It's fine but not intentionally GDPR compliant, and you know how things go otherwise: If you have more than $300,000,000,000 in the bank you can have 15% bad reviews but if you have $50,000 in the bank you can't have 1% bad reviews or you're too risky (not sure how that logic works but that's my impression of the internet).

    i am with you (in content and with a service with you, but you know that)

    Thanked by 1jar
  • @bikegremlin said:

    @jar said:

    @hyperblast said:
    is mxrout not recommended for business applications? and if so, why not?

    It's fine but not intentionally GDPR compliant, and you know how things go otherwise: If you have more than $300,000,000,000 in the bank you can have 15% bad reviews but if you have $50,000 in the bank you can't have 1% bad reviews or you're too risky (not sure how that logic works but that's my impression of the internet).

    Exactly.

    If there's one positive thing about my country not being a part of EU, it's the damn GDPR.

    I mean: I care about security and privacy. As far as I know and can tell, MXroute is a trustworthy email provider. It just hasn't (publicly, "officially") ticked all the GDPR-required nonsense catches and gotchas.

    The funniest thing are the people who are in the EU and are very happy to comply with the GDPR, considering it to be the best thing ever - while carrying their smartphones everywhere, having profiles on social networks, paying with cards (and considering cash payments to be "barbaric" and "obsolete"), etc.

    Lawyers and "GDPR-cookie providers" are making a ton of money, while small, independent business websites are fucked, so I suppose the law works as it was (really) intended...

    "If there's one positive thing about my country not being a part of EU, it's the damn GDPR."

    even people from the EU are rejecting it more and more because of questionable developments. the EU is now interfering in matters that are none of its business and that are reminiscent of gloomy bolshevik times. strangely enough, in my opinion, very few people are interested in this. or the other way around, maybe they want exactly such a development and are secretly striving for the EUdSSR. who knows?

  • ralfralf Member

    As a former European (UK!), I agree that the GDPR is quite a pain to work with, but... I think it's overall a net good. As a business, you can keep any data you need for a business purpose, however you can't just keep any data you like just in case you might think of a need for it later. Likewise, if you no longer need it, you should delete it. And you need to publish a clear policy of what data you are keeping and for what purpose. For the user, all of these goals are worthwhile.

    Things like the cookie stuff is a sideshow. What we've ended up with is the worst possible user experience, but I think that's partly because popping up a dialog box is the easiest to do as a developer, but also a kind of protest about having to do it anyway, so that the user will feel negatively about the law, and partly because people are so worried about being sued that they want to make it obvious to anyone who might sue them for a violation can't possibly miss the dialog. It's actually sufficient to just display a notice when the cookie is created (doesn't have to pop up) and a note on your privacy policy about what the cookie is for, what data is associated with it and how long it's kept.

  • AdvinAdvin Member, Patron Provider

    https://www.ovhcloud.com/en/emails/hosted-exchange/
    I believe OVH offers in France - not many mail providers explicitly state the server location from what I've seen

    Thanked by 1webcraft
  • @ralf said:
    As a former European (UK!), I agree that the GDPR is quite a pain to work with, but... I think it's overall a net good. As a business, you can keep any data you need for a business purpose, however you can't just keep any data you like just in case you might think of a need for it later. Likewise, if you no longer need it, you should delete it. And you need to publish a clear policy of what data you are keeping and for what purpose. For the user, all of these goals are worthwhile.

    Things like the cookie stuff is a sideshow. What we've ended up with is the worst possible user experience, but I think that's partly because popping up a dialog box is the easiest to do as a developer, but also a kind of protest about having to do it anyway, so that the user will feel negatively about the law, and partly because people are so worried about being sued that they want to make it obvious to anyone who might sue them for a violation can't possibly miss the dialog. It's actually sufficient to just display a notice when the cookie is created (doesn't have to pop up) and a note on your privacy policy about what the cookie is for, what data is associated with it and how long it's kept.

    To be 100% compliant, all the cookies must be desabled until the visitor agrees to them.

    Which could likely break some functionality.

    I think that's why the blocking pop-ups are used - so an average (dumb?) user doesn't think the website is "broken."

    The net result is that average small business / blogger is terrified and forced to go with SAAS website, or pay a lot of money to lawyers and developers (or "cookie popup provider" companies) in order "to comply."

    I could be wrong, but as far as I could research and ask (lawyers and business owners) - it's a complicated, costly mess, with a poor UI/UX, and no real, measurable benefits (the data processing and protection was, at least by the law, protected "even before" the GDPR).

    @hyperblast said:

    even people from the EU are rejecting it more and more because of questionable developments. the EU is now interfering in matters that are none of its business and that are reminiscent of gloomy bolshevik times. strangely enough, in my opinion, very few people are interested in this. or the other way around, maybe they want exactly such a development and are secretly striving for the EUdSSR. who knows?

    My country was much better off when we had communism (Yugoslavia). At least for the normal people (you couldn't get filthy rich, but I don't see that as a downside).

    EU is a tool for the centralized, big capital, nothing to do with "bolshevism."

    OT:
    MXroute is good for business emails as well IMO, but check with your GDPR lawyers for the legal stuff (if I understand correctly, even if you are outside the EU, but communicate with people from the EU... lol, idiots).

  • MumblyMumbly Member
    edited August 20

    @bikegremlin said: My country was much better off when we had communism (Yugoslavia). At least for the normal people (you couldn't get filthy rich, but I don't see that as a downside).

    That's the sentiment we mostly read from Serbians today. Not many Slovenians and Croatians share this delusion.
    Yeah, everything was better with two types of bread in a half-empty junkhole called grochery store and one pair of jeans trousers smuggled from the Trieste (Italy), right? :)
    People take many things like possibility to make international payment with paypal or making order from amazon.de for granted today. I remember times when your, our little countries were excluded from many of those things. Even later as separated countries already.
    Many things you take for granted today and need for your work you weren't able to obtain in heaven called Yugloslavia unless someone smuggled them for you to the country.
    Yes it was nice, we were young, careless ... but lets not idolize something what wasn't there.

    Thanked by 2mrTom webcraft
  • @Mumbly said:

    @bikegremlin said: My country was much better off when we had communism (Yugoslavia). At least for the normal people (you couldn't get filthy rich, but I don't see that as a downside).

    That's the sentiment we mostly read from Serbians today. Not many Slovenians and Croatians share this delusion.

    I see what you did there.
    Lol.

    @Mumbly said:
    Yeah, everything was better with two types of bread in a half-empty junkhole called grochery store and one pair of jeans trousers smuggled from the Trieste (Italy), right? :)
    People take many things like possibility to make international payment with paypal or making order from amazon.de for granted today. I remember times when your, our little countries were excluded from many of those things. Even later as separated countries already.
    Many things you take for granted today and need for your work you weren't able to obtain in heaven called Yugloslavia unless someone smuggled them for you to the country.

    If you compare the time when Yugoslavia existed (i.e. until 1988 practically) - it was among the best places to live in, and pretty advanced in terms of tech, as well as the standard of living, "even" for the "ordinary" people.

  • in the brussels bureaucracy, i clearly recognize bolshevik excesses. zealots at all corners and ends who have eroded the eu citizen as an enemy. the goal of such zealots is clear, the all-powerful central superstate that regulates everything. as a rule, however, then regulates everything worse. therefore, my fear that we are moving in europe (!=EU) towards a kind of EUdSSR (=CCCP). i would not like that in any case, because then everything will be worse.

  • MumblyMumbly Member
    edited August 20

    If you compare the time when Yugoslavia existed (i.e. until 1988 practically) - it was among the best places to live in, and pretty advanced in terms of tech, as well as the standard of living, "even" for the "ordinary" people.

    Yeah, sure ... :)
    Or just people take many things for granted today.

  • but this does not have to degenerate into a political seminar in which everyone praises his preferred system. just so much, we have overcome socialism (twice), it has failed twice and a third time we do not need such a man-eating experiment anymore.

  • kalipuskalipus Member
    edited August 20

    https://www.manitu.de/webhosting/webhosting-50-gb/

    install nextcloud on it and you ready to go for webdav and caldav

    davx-ose for android
    https://f-droid.org/en/packages/at.bitfire.davdroid/

  • sanvitsanvit Member

    https://www.servercow.de/mailcow?lang=en#managed

    Hosted mailcow? Kinda expensive but I do like the Mailcow UI. You could also self-host one and take full control (I have mine hosted on Netcup)

  • alentoalento Member

    @vitobotta said:
    I use MXroute for personal domains but a colleague wants to set up something for a side project that will be a company and wants email hosted in Europe. Is there something like MXroute in Europe where you paid only for the storage?

    Thank

    Surely there is a MXroute reseller in the EU that would work??

  • alentoalento Member
    edited August 20

    @sanvit said:
    https://www.servercow.de/mailcow?lang=en#managed

    Hosted mailcow? Kinda expensive but I do like the Mailcow UI. You could also self-host one and take full control (I have mine hosted on Netcup)

    Looks like they offer only a 20gb package with the ability to add "up to" an additional 15gb storage ... which is not enough.

    OOPS, wrong thread ... sorry.

  • alentoalento Member

    @vitobotta said:
    I use MXroute for personal domains but a colleague wants to set up something for a side project that will be a company and wants email hosted in Europe. Is there something like MXroute in Europe where you paid only for the storage?

    Thank

    Pavin Joseph's Mailcheap.co. @mailcheap

    Thanked by 1mailcheap
  • mrTommrTom Member

    @bikegremlin said
    EU is a tool for the centralized, big capital, nothing to do with "bolshevism."

    If you compare the time when Yugoslavia existed (i.e. until 1988 practically) - it was among the best places to live in, and pretty advanced in terms of tech, as well as the standard of living, "even" for the "ordinary" people.

    Let me guess - you are from Serbia, right?

    because for some reason all other parts of Yugoslavia thought differently and wanted to leave Yugoslavia and join the EU as soon as possible.
    And unlike Serbia, some actually managed to do it and are doing way better in every aspect today :-)

    To be 100% compliant, all the cookies must be desabled until the visitor agrees to them.

    another falsehood that doesnt get true by repeating it over and over again. If there are good reasons for cookies and they are not used to collect/transfer data to 3rd parties they can of course be used under GDPR - the annoying banners are not required for reasonable use cases!
    But one would of course have to read and understand the actuals laws instead of just ranting.

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