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Should I use libvirt or just kvm cli tool for my future VPS hosting platform?
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Should I use libvirt or just kvm cli tool for my future VPS hosting platform?

erhwegesrgsrerhwegesrgsr Member
edited November 2012 in General

Hi there,

So my idea is to have one central control panel.
All the VPS nodes will have local IPs for extra security, only one node will be able to talk to the nodes.

So I need to think of the best way to access the nodes from the central control panel, options:

  • Reverse SSH tunnel
  • SSH dynamic SOCKS proxy
  • Run the libvirt commands in a shell

How I would talk to the VPS nodes:

Regards.

Comments

  • @BronzeByte said: call them over SSH or writing my own API

    yuck

  • erhwegesrgsrerhwegesrgsr Member
    edited November 2012

    @unused said: yuck

    So what do you honestly think libvirt with SSH option enabled does?

  • @Zen said: Libvirt works via URI?

    Look for "qemu+ssh://system" in the manpages ;-)

  • libvirt is pretty bad too - if you don't want to manage the backend, take a look at openstack and build around it (though libvirt is used in some places)

    I think you're going to save yourself alot of headache if you don't have to worry about the hypervisor- heck, onapp is pretty cheap and has a robust api.

    If you had to go that way, python bindings/setup async services/message q handle the hypervisors, but i'd really think 10 times about doing it because it's likely to save you sleepless nights in the long right.

    (Maybe i'm thinking you're doing something much more complex, if you're just doing basic builds/management then libvirt will do that will enough)

  • @unused said: onapp is pretty cheap

    Not really, paying per core makes me want to kill myself...

    It will be a really basic VPS unmanaged platform.
    I am a very experienced programmer so I just want to save myself some pain in the ass when I eventually need to switch for some reason :)

  • @BronzeByte said: I am a very experienced programmer so I just want to save myself some pain in the ass when I eventually need to switch for some reason :)

    Libvirt is multiplatform when it's about supported virtualizations.

    @BronzeByte said: I would just call them over SSH or writing my own API to call them using my own protocol.

    Appears that libvirt does EXACTLY this :)

    Thanks for any input.

  • joepie91joepie91 Member, Patron Provider

    Be aware that libvirt has absolutely abysmal support for OpenVZ, if you ever plan on using it.

  • @joepie91 said: Be aware that libvirt has absolutely abysmal support for OpenVZ, if you ever plan on using it.

    OpenVZ is a complete platform :D

  • For KVM, definitely use libvirt. States, autostart, performance metrics, etc. all available for free! As said above, OVZ support in libvirt is sketchy at best.

    There is no harm calling virsh over SSH - roll a daemon if you want but remember you will have to stick encryption, authentication, etc in front of it. SSH gives you this for free, and virsh returns standard exit codes. You also have one less long-running process you have to monitor/manage.

    Depending on your setup/complexity, I'd say using the libvirt bindings are optional. I didn't care for the Ruby bindings when I developed mine, so I didn't use them!

  • Updated OP.

  • erhwegesrgsrerhwegesrgsr Member
    edited November 2012

    @Zen said: use the perl bindings

    someone made a version for node.js, I would rather use that.
    Will look into that tunnel thing :)

    EDIT:
    A VPN (TUN/TAP or PPP) could do the job too I guess instead of tunnels :D

  • A VPN IS a tunnel, if you weren't aware :P

  • @Wintereise

    meant single port SSH tunnels

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