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I got kimsufi but it has 75893 Power on Hours HDD
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I got kimsufi but it has 75893 Power on Hours HDD

webeastwebeast Member
edited May 2023 in General

Worries me a lot. Is it even safe to use it.. What u think?

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Comments

  • bruh21bruh21 Member, Host Rep

    sure it is. just take backups

    Thanked by 2webeast netomx
  • ZreindZreind Member

    pray

  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator, Veteran

    KS-1?

  • farsighterfarsighter Member
    edited May 2023

    If it's been running 9 years it must last longer. A good sign of being a well built vintage HDD. In distant past products were often built with durability and longevity in mind.

  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator, Veteran

    @farsighter said: If it's been running 9 years it must last longer. A good sign of being a well built vintage HDD. In distant past products were often built with durability and longevity in mind.

    That's some wacky logic.

    Thanked by 3emgh AXYZE arda
  • farsighterfarsighter Member
    edited May 2023

    @raindog308 said:
    That's some wacky logic.

    I was trying to find a positive side :blush:

    Thanked by 1raindog308
  • GPT probably has better logic for your question:

    Having a high number of power-on hours (POH) on a hard disk drive (HDD) can be a cause for concern, as it indicates prolonged usage and potential wear and tear. While there is no fixed threshold after which a drive becomes unsafe to use, it's generally recommended to monitor the drive's health closely and consider replacing it if you notice any signs of failure or instability.

    Here are a few factors to consider when assessing the safety of using a HDD with high POH:

    Manufacturer's specifications: Check the specifications provided by the HDD manufacturer to see if they mention the estimated lifespan or average operating hours for the drive. This information can give you an idea of how much longer the drive may be expected to function reliably.

    Drive health monitoring: Most modern operating systems and disk management tools provide utilities to monitor the health of your hard drive. Use these tools to check the SMART (Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology) data of the drive. Look for any warning signs such as excessive bad sectors, read/write errors, or high temperature readings.

    Backup important data: Regardless of the drive's health, it's always essential to maintain backups of your important data. This precaution ensures that even if the HDD fails, you won't lose your valuable files.

    Consider replacing the drive: If you have significant concerns about the drive's reliability, it might be worth considering replacing it with a new one. This can provide peace of mind and eliminate the risk of sudden failure.

    Ultimately, the decision to use a hard drive with high POH is subjective and depends on your tolerance for risk, the importance of the data being stored, and your budget for a replacement. If you're uncertain about the drive's condition or its potential impact on your data's safety, consulting with a professional technician or data recovery specialist could provide more specific advice tailored to your situation.

  • dahartigandahartigan Member
    edited May 2023

    That disk is strong on plough.

  • @raindog308 said:

    @farsighter said: If it's been running 9 years it must last longer. A good sign of being a well built vintage HDD. In distant past products were often built with durability and longevity in mind.

    That's some wacky logic.

    Maybe a little wacky, but I kinda get it, when I have a drive hit 50k+ hours without a single SMART error or sign of problem, I at least know it's probably going to die slowly of natural causes and not grenade randomly on me. In my experience the sudden failure drives are pretty low hour count, but either way, always keep backups because anything can happen.

  • themewthemew Member

    Just pulled this off mine:
    Power_On_Hours 0x0012 085 085 000 Old_age Always - 107688

    Still hummin' along :)

    Thanked by 1darkimmortal
  • FlorinMarianFlorinMarian Member, Host Rep

    I think you don't have many options, it's quite simple.
    If the HDD has bad sectors then you can open a Ticket in which you request a new HDD citing the reason that can be proven and if you don't have bad sectors take it and use it with confidence because even with a new HDD you should have to make backups, not being able to rely on a single HDD if you have data that really needs to be kept.

    Thanked by 1BlazinDimes
  • webeastwebeast Member

    @raindog308 said:
    KS-1?

    Yes.

  • CroissantCroissant Member
    edited May 2023

    as long as there is no rellocated sectors and abnormal rw errors then you are good when you start to see those even a few then it is time to send a fat ticket

  • Shot2Shot2 Member

    @farsighter said:

    @raindog308 said:
    That's some wacky logic.

    I was trying to find a positive side :blush:

    Google + "bathtub curve".

  • my ks-game ssd disk : Power_On_Hours 60312

  • jon617jon617 Veteran

    These single disk kimsufi's give risk mitigation practice.

  • TeoMTeoM Member

    This crappy server must have been funded 30 times already.

    I would make noise until I get a system which is either new or maximum 1 year.

  • PixelsPixels Member
    root@srv10:~# smartctl -a /dev/sdb -d cciss,0 | grep "Device Model"
    Device Model:     MB2000EBZQC
    root@srv10:~# smartctl -a /dev/sda -d cciss,0 | grep Power_On_Hours
      9 Power_On_Hours          0x0032   013   013   000    Old_age   Always       -       76626
    root@srv10:~# smartctl -a /dev/sdb -d cciss,0 | grep Power_On_Hours
      9 Power_On_Hours          0x0032   013   013   000    Old_age   Always       -       76626
    

    Beat you by 1000 hours lol
    And running on RAID 0

  • TomBGTomBG Member

    If there are no re-allocated sectors and no sectors that are being read slower than the rest, then it will most likely survive 3-4 more years.
    I had more HDDs die in the first month of use than from heavy abuse.
    Always make backups anyway.

  • moodwritermoodwriter Member
    edited May 2023

    Just checked hours on SYS arm server.
    43143

    Model Family: HGST Ultrastar 7K6000
    Device Model: HGST HUS726020ALA610
    User Capacity: 2 TB
    Rotation Rate: 7200 rpm
    Form Factor: 3.5 inches

  • VoidVoid Member

    @webeast said:

    @raindog308 said:
    KS-1?

    Yes.

    When did you get it? Are they still giving 2TB disks though it says 1TB on the site ?

  • @farsighter said:
    If it's been running 9 years it must last longer. A good sign of being a well built vintage HDD. In distant past products were often built with durability and longevity in mind.

    Got a ~20 years old seagate hdd laying around, still working.

  • davidedavide Member

    You young boy, none of my hard drives are that young.

  • @treesmokah said:

    Got a ~20 years old seagate hdd laying around, still working.

    Personal usage patterns must be quite different from an HDD in a datacenter so that's possible, especially if mainly used for backup/reading without intensive rewrites and handled with care in general.

  • @BlazinDimes said:
    Maybe a little wacky, but I kinda get it, when I have a drive hit 50k+ hours without a single SMART error or sign of problem, I at least know it's probably going to die slowly of natural causes and not grenade randomly on me. In my experience the sudden failure drives are pretty low hour count, but either way, always keep backups because anything can happen.

    Isn't Backblaze said that most HDD drive will fail within 3 years, if it goes pass that, it gonna run for years?

    Thanked by 1BlazinDimes
  • PulsedMediaPulsedMedia Member, Patron Provider

    It either works, or it does not. Power on hours doesn't really matter.

    Sure failures increase after something like 4-5 years, but it remains at the same level as drives of less than 6 months age.

    We are talking here a difference of between like 1% and 2% annually in magnitude.

    Thanked by 1RapToN
  • We should have a party at 76000 hours!

  • I'd ask for a replacement with 6473 less hours.

  • raindog308raindog308 Administrator, Veteran

    @Pixels said: And running on RAID 0

    YOLORAID for top performance.

    @treesmokah said: Got a ~20 years old seagate hdd laying around, still working.

    What's the GB size on that vampire?

    Thanked by 2Pixels ehab
  • SaahibSaahib Host Rep, Veteran

    I now can't find article from blackblaze about HDD failure, but they regularly publish data and observation, in short, there is a small percentage of HDDs those just refuse to die.

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