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What are these hosting resources terms?
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What are these hosting resources terms?

Below are some of the terms I found on shared hosting resources. What do they mean and what impact do they make on a website when comparing resources of different hosting companies?

  1. SSD vs NVMe SSD
  2. CPU - 100% vs 150%
  3. Memory - 1GB vs 3GB
  4. Entry Processes Limit - 50 vs 200
  5. I/O Limit - 10MB/s vs 80MB/s
  6. IOPS Limit - 4,096 vs 15,000
  7. INODES Limit - No Limit
  8. Email - Webmail vs Mailchannels Hybrid
  9. Object caching - Redis vs Memcached

Comments

  • afnafn Member
    edited November 14

    @kidrock said: SSD vs NVMe SSD
    ...
    Memory - 1GB vs 3GB
    I/O Limit - 10MB/s vs 80MB/s

    Did you ever buy(/use) a computer before? These ones are not particular to hosting, they just mean the same thing even for hosting, no tricks.

    Google:
    IOPS (input/output operations per second) is the standard unit of measurement for the maximum number of reads and writes to non-contiguous storage locations.

    @kidrock said: INODES Limit

    • The inode (index node) is a data structure in a Unix-style file system that describes a file-system object such as a file or a directory.
    • The moment a file system runs out of inodes, all new files and folders will be rejected.
    • Shared hosting inodes are limited due to the number of resources the system requires to gather the data/locate the file from a large index table.

    All copy pasted from google... I did not write anything myself. just highlighted your bullet points >right click > web search

    Thanked by 1kidrock
  • ralfralf Member

    @kidrock said:
    2. CPU - 100% vs 150%

    This is when you turn the CPU up to 11.

    Thanked by 2emg kidrock
  • emgemg Member

    @kidrock said:
    Below are some of the terms I found on shared hosting resources. What do they mean and what impact do they make on a website when comparing resources of different hosting companies?

    1. SSD vs NVMe SSD
    2. CPU - 100% vs 150%
    3. Memory - 1GB vs 3GB
    4. Entry Processes Limit - 50 vs 200
    5. I/O Limit - 10MB/s vs 80MB/s
    6. IOPS Limit - 4,096 vs 15,000
    7. INODES Limit - No Limit
    8. Email - Webmail vs Mailchannels Hybrid
    9. Object caching - Redis vs Memcached

    Honestly, these are all marketing terms implying better performance than older hardware technologies. Those shared hosting providers want you to think that their hosting is better than their competitors.

    It is not obvious to me that these factors translate well into determining the real world performance of shared hosting providers. There are many other factors involved, including the most basic - how many other customers/websites are running on that same server?

    I would be looking more for customer experiences with the hosting providers you are interested in. Do you see complaints about performance? Customer service? Many problems and issues?

    Here are my attempts at definitions for the terms you posted. I doubt they will help much:

    1. SSD - is a solid state drive. Implies much faster disk storage compared with spinning disks. NVMe SSD is one kind of SSD - the "NVMe" is a fast interface to the drive.
    2. CPU - That's how much processor your account gets, I suppose. I have no idea what 150% CPU means. More than one core, perhaps?
    3. Memory - How much RAM is allocated to your shared hosting services.
    4. Entry Processes Limit - How many scripts, cron jobs, etc. can run at the same time. More is better, but you may not need them. It depends on the design of your websites and how many of them you are running.
    5. I/O Limit - Based on "MB/s" it means how fast the network traffic can run from your websites. Sometimes called "bandwidth".
    6. IOPS are individual I/O operations per second. Reads/writes/sends/receives happen through individual I/O operations.
    7. INODES Limit - Inodes are an aspect of the directory structure on the disk. No limit implies as many files and directories as you want.
    8. Email - Webmail is a general term for the web interface to read and send email. You may see names like "RoundCube" "SquirrelMail", "Horde" and others, which are different web interfaces for email. Mailchannels is a paid service for providers (not end customers like you) that help make email more reliable and prevent spam. I do not know what the "hybrid" means.
    9. Object caching - Frequently retrieved objects can be cached in memory for faster performance. Redis and Memcaching are two different programs that do it.

    As I said above, I would be looking at the providers' reputations for quality, performance, reliability, customer service, etc. Trying to compare them based on those "features" above may inform the decision or it may be an exercise in futility. They should not be the only factors you consider when choosing a shared hosting provider.

    I hope this helps.

    Thanked by 2kidrock niranjan
  • @emg said:
    I hope this helps.

    Thanks for doing his homework

    Thanked by 3ralf emg ElonBezos
  • @jiggawattz said:

    @emg said:
    I hope this helps.

    Thanks for doing his homework

    I have done my homework on Google. But reading real life experiences in this forum (that's why I joined the forum) as explained by members like @emg above is much better to understand and decide than reading Google results 🙂

  • @emg said:
    1. SSD - is a solid state drive. Implies much faster disk storage compared with spinning disks. NVMe SSD is one kind of SSD - the "NVMe" is a fast interface to the drive.

    Thanks for your explanation. Found this chart. Seems like NVMe is way faster

    CPU - That's how much processor your account gets, I suppose. I have no idea what 150% CPU means. More than one core, perhaps?

    I forgot but I saw 150% CPU on one of the shared hosting site.

    Memory - How much RAM is allocated to your shared hosting services.

    I guess more RAM is better for Wordpress site. But I don't know if it is CPU or RAM that is important for a shared hosting to handle the number of visitors.

    Email - Webmail is a general term for the web interface to read and send email. You may see names like "RoundCube" "SquirrelMail", "Horde" and others, which are different web interfaces for email. Mailchannels is a paid service for providers (not end customers like you) that help make email more reliable and prevent spam. I do not know what the "hybrid" means.

    Saw Mailchannels Hybrid on @dustinc Racknerd post here
    https://lowendtalk.com/discussion/182479/official-b-l-a-c-k-f-r-i-d-a-y-thread-community-endorsed-take-a-peek-racknerds-black-friday/p1

    Object caching - Frequently retrieved objects can be cached in memory for faster performance. Redis and Memcaching are two different programs that do it.

    Which one is better for a WordPress site?

  • dustincdustinc Member, Patron Provider, Top Host
    edited November 15
  • @kidrock said: SSD vs > SSD
    CPU - 100% vs 150%
    Memory - 1GB vs 3GB
    Entry Processes Limit - 50 vs 200
    I/O Limit - 10MB/s vs 80MB/s
    Limit - 4,096 vs 15,000
    Limit - No Limit
    Email - Webmail vs Mailchannels Hybrid
    Object caching - Redis vs Memcached

    simply, anything more is better for high traffic sites or for wordpress sites with many plugins.

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