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Naming of server hostname
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Naming of server hostname

TekoTeko Member
edited October 7 in General

These days I'm dealing with hostname and FQDN. I have read many discussions but I think they are not the best solution. Any idea?

I'm using this naming method right now:
fsn1-dc12-ex43-1.hetzner.example.com

I'm thinking of changing it to hetzner-fsn1-dc12-ex43-1.example.com, or maybe adding a country code de.

How do you guys name your server? No fancy name :)

Comments

  • _cece_cece Member
    edited October 7

    ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

  • caiicaii Member

    ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

  • doghouchdoghouch Member
    edited October 7

    @Teko said:
    These days I'm dealing with hostname and FQDN. I have read many discussions but I think they are not the best solution. Any idea?

    I'm using this naming method right now:
    fsn1-dc12-ex43-1.hetzner.example.com

    I'm thinking of changing it to hetzner-fsn1-dc12-ex43-1.example.com, or maybe adding a country code de.

    How do you guys name your server? No fancy name :)

    All my hostnames are pretty simple and are based on universal ISO country codes. For example:

    (closest IATA airport code) - (node/VPS #) - (ISO 3166 3-letter country code) 
    
                 ewr            -      1       -                usa
    

    ... which results in:

    ewr-1-usa.srv.elde.st

    I denote "srv" as any external server and have a internal designation for homelab stuff. I don't generally label the datacentre (as that's not something I'm usually concerned with).

    Added bonus with a single subdomain: one wildcard SSL is usually enough to cover all of my VPSes (I know this isn't the most secure thing; I do not care).

  • let_rockslet_rocks Member
    edited October 7

    Hostname:
    shuf -n 1 /usr/share/dict/words
    I re-run it until I get a word I like.

    Or I use other random word generator like online ones.

    FQDN will be the result from the shuf command + a domain name, which differs across the environments I'm working in.

    For example in a test setup domain will be localhost.localdomain.

    Thanked by 1emperor
  • TekoTeko Member
    edited October 7

    @doghouch said:

    @Teko said:
    These days I'm dealing with hostname and FQDN. I have read many discussions but I think they are not the best solution. Any idea?

    I'm using this naming method right now:
    fsn1-dc12-ex43-1.hetzner.example.com

    I'm thinking of changing it to hetzner-fsn1-dc12-ex43-1.example.com, or maybe adding a country code de.

    How do you guys name your server? No fancy name :)

    All my hostnames are pretty simple and are based on universal ISO country codes. For example:

    (closest IATA airport code) - (node/VPS #) - (ISO 3166 3-letter country code) 
    
                 ewr            -      1       -                usa
    

    ... which results in:

    ewr-1-usa.srv.elde.st

    I denote "srv" as any external server and have a internal designation for homelab stuff. I don't generally label the datacentre (as that's not something I'm usually concerned with).

    Added bonus with a single subdomain: one wildcard SSL is usually enough to cover all of my VPSes (I know this isn't the most secure thing; I do not care).

    I used the IATA airport code be the part of name before but I found that how can I find the closest airport if I don’t know where the data centre is.

    Like EWR and TEB, I know the server is located at Secaucus only. :(

  • pkrpkr Member

    I use my girlfriend's name.

    Girlfriend_name.example.com

    Thanked by 1puerklint
  • TekoTeko Member
    edited October 7

    @pkr said:
    I use my girlfriend's name.

    Girlfriend_name.example.com

    I don’t have enough girlfriends to fill up all of my server hostname. :*

  • OhJohnOhJohn Member

    Teko, you are too fast ;)

  • tjntjn Member
    edited October 7

    role-number-location

    eg. gw-001-fsn, web-001-ldn, db-001-nyc

  • yoursunnyyoursunny Member, IPv6 Advocate

    Paid server with dedicated IPv4:
    vps0, vps1, …, vps9.

    Free server; server without dedicated IPv4:
    box0, box1, …, box9.

    I can have up to ten in each category.
    If I don't have a hostname, I must cancel or transfer out some, before ordering new ones.

  • add_iTadd_iT Member
    edited October 7
    1. node vps name [dot] domain name (eg. FFME005.example.com)
    2. country code & vps number - virtualization type [dot ]domain name (eg. JP1-KVM.example.com)
    3. region code - vps ram ammount [dot] domain name (eg. lax-8g.example.com)
  • VPS - bobs
    Dedi - vagene

    Each host will be labelled as such:

    open.bobs or open.vagene or show.bobs or send.bobs

  • I use my clients personal information

    ssn-dob-id#-first-last.host

    Thanked by 1darkimmortal
  • I use the host provider's name and country code.

  • prod-{id}-{loc}.domain.com
    idle-{id}-{loc}.domain.com

  • raviravi Member

    random-word.example.com

    Example:
    atom.example.com
    ray.example.com
    diode.example.com
    hertz.exampl.ecom

    etc...

    Thanked by 1Arkas
  • My company name is "Feline Tech".
    I name my servers based on feline species name. Like tiger.felinetech.net, jaguar.felinetech.net.

    Running out of species name though. Thinking of renaming internal usage nodes to my pet cat names.

  • i just use a subdomain.
    so pointing to the dedicated ip.
    and nahhhhhh i can access it..

  • emgemg Member

    What I think I see are two different use cases for server naming in this thread:

    1. You have only a few servers and it is relatively easy to think of unique names for them. There are all kinds of popular "themes" that people choose: planets, Star Trek, famous people, landmarks, etc. etc. etc.

    2. You have many servers and you need to include "metadata" in the name to make it easier to keep track of them. Metadata might include location (e.g., country code), purpose, provider name, location in the rack, etc. etc. etc.

    My use case is #1.
    I recently made a change and named my servers after animals such as dog, cat, raccoon, possum, bear, etc.

    I am not that pleased with it, especially after I created aliases to connect to the servers. Using the alias "dog" worked fine, but the alias for "cat" was a failure - it covered up the "cat" (concatenate and print files) command. Doh!!

    (A long time ago, I discovered similar tricks in the C preprocessor to expose and hide C variables using matching macro variable names with #define, #ifdef, #ifndef, #undef, etc. If you're a C programmer, give it a try - you can do amazing things with it.)

  • I have a schema...
    Location + number + 3-character usage + 3-character env + number
    Example of Germany-based VPN production server: de1vpnprd01 and de1vpnprd01
    Both in DE01 location, VPN Production servers 1 and 2

    And in case of other location of the server in Germany, I change the first number:
    Application dev server: de2appdev01

    Same with www test server in Poland, Warsaw
    pl1wwwtst01

    Or storage in France : fr1strprd01 (France 1 Storage Production 01

    I asign identifiers to locations as below
    de1 - Oracle Frankfurt
    de2 - Contabo Nurnberg
    de3 - PHP-Friends Frankfurt (same location, another DC)
    pl1 - OVHCloud Warsaw
    fr1 - OVHCloud Roubaix

    Had fr2 in OVH Gravelines

    When it comes to environments:
    prd - production
    tst - test
    dev - development
    sbx - sandbox

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