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Which Laptop Headache Help me Choose!
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Which Laptop Headache Help me Choose!

edited October 7 in General

Got tons of tons of Dell Latitudes & Dell XPS

having one for business for my self but cant decide LET Decide for me

Dell Latitude 5320

15-1135G7 ( 2.40Ghz Quad Core)
16GB DDR4 (2 out of 8 slots used)
256 GB NVME SSD (Will Upgrade if i keep)
Windows 11 Pro
Wifi 6
Intel Iris Xe Graphics
Touch Screen 1080P

Dell XPS 7390

I7-107010U (6 Core 1.10Ghz )
16GB DDR3 (2 out of 2 slots used)
512 NVME SSD (no need to upgrade)
Windows 11 Pro
Wifi 6
Intel UHD Graphics (poor)
Touchscreen 4K

like the screen on the XPS , but unsure as the ddr3 and the weak cpu hmmm HELP LET!

Help Me
  1. Help Me Choose a laptop27 votes
    1. Dell Latitude 5320
      40.74%
    2. Dell XPS 7390
      59.26%

Comments

  • yoursunnyyoursunny Member, IPv6 Advocate

    What monster has 8 DIMMs?
    Laptop ain't server.

  • @yoursunny said:
    What monster has 8 DIMMs?
    Laptop ain't server.

    its nuts normally 2 slots on a laptop

    https://prnt.sc/CDtxJUXfhK5d

  • HalfEatenPieHalfEatenPie Member
    edited October 7

    For a laptop I care about battery life and portability.

    So the specs I really care about is the amount of life you have on the battery (or more specifically, what's the battery's capacity) and then what's the weight and dimensions of the laptop.

    I'm not looking for a 'beefy' or 'powerful' laptop. If I wanted a powerful workstation I'd stick with a desktop computer (or SSH into a server). I focus on one that lasts on the battery charge and isn't too heavy or too big.

  • MikeAMikeA Member, Host Rep
    edited October 7

    https://rog.asus.com/laptops/rog-flow/2021-rog-flow-x13-series/

    This is what I have as my daily driver. Connected to my two 1440p monitors and laptop sits under my desk. 13" means super portable, I can grab and go and have all of my data on me. Ryzen CPU, discrete GPU, and I have the eGPU accessory with a RTX 3070 which has many extra ports. If you want a good work laptop that can do anything consider one of these or the bigger models.

  • abeermabeerm Member, Patron Provider

    @Jasonhyperhost said:
    Got tons of tons of Dell Latitudes & Dell XPS

    having one for business for my self but cant decide LET Decide for me

    Dell Latitude 5320

    15-1135G7 ( 2.40Ghz Quad Core)
    16GB DDR4 (2 out of 8 slots used)
    256 GB NVME SSD (Will Upgrade if i keep)
    Windows 11 Pro
    Wifi 6
    Intel Iris Xe Graphics
    Touch Screen 1080P

    Dell XPS 7390

    I7-107010U (6 Core 1.10Ghz )
    16GB DDR3 (2 out of 2 slots used)
    512 NVME SSD (no need to upgrade)
    Windows 11 Pro
    Wifi 6
    Intel UHD Graphics (poor)
    Touchscreen 4K

    like the screen on the XPS , but unsure as the ddr3 and the weak cpu hmmm HELP LET!

    Go for Dell XPS 7390

  • ArkasArkas Moderator

    XPS, it's a no brainer!

  • What the hell with xps cpu having 1.10GHz? Typo?

  • doghouchdoghouch Member
    edited October 7

    @Jasonhyperhost said:

    @yoursunny said:
    What monster has 8 DIMMs?
    Laptop ain't server.

    its nuts normally 2 slots on a laptop

    https://prnt.sc/CDtxJUXfhK5d

    Windows doesn’t always report the correct number of DIMM slots — you should check/find a teardown video.

  • Skip 11 or 10th gen intel.

    Get 12th gen.

    get IPS display, touchscreen is meme, rarely used in most cases

  • RapToNRapToN Member, Host Rep
    edited October 7

    @Jasonhyperhost said:
    like the screen on the XPS , but unsure as the ddr3 and the weak cpu hmmm HELP LET!

    I don't think the DDR3 RAM makes that much difference. In any case, the screen would be more important to me.

    Definitely XPS, if it has to be Dell ;)

    @LTniger said:
    What the hell with xps cpu having 1.10GHz? Typo?

    Intel Core CPUs ending with a U usually have a very low base tackt to keep power consumption low.
    Personally, I have had extremely good experiences with the CPUs for work since several generations.

  • emghemgh Member
    edited October 7

    Wtf do you guys do with your laptops? Research for the NSA?

    I have two laptops: One M2 Pro, using it basically as a desktop, hooked up to a screen, Anne Pro 2, Mouse, basically everything.

    I would disconnect it if I'm going away for months, but otherwise, I've got a much lighter M1 Air that isn't ever connected - so it's a great laptop for getting around with.

    Not that it helps in anyway.

    My main question I believe is this: What requires these crazy resources in a laptop, where portability isn't even a big feature since the battery life will be shittier than shit?

    Very unnecessary read explaining why I've got two computers that are really alike without actually being stupid rich or spoiled:

    I hate coming across as boasting, so just for reference: I would never have bought the M1 Air myself if I knew what would come. I bought the M1 Air when being a student, and not so long later I started working full-time at an SEO-agency. I regularly spend time on fucked up Gutenberg pages and I'm not paid to fix it (only do SEO). Since my 8 GB RAM on the Air that I bought myself couldn't handle it, after months of frustration with Chrome/Safari always crashing, I demanded my boss to authorize me to get an M2 Pro with the upgraded 16 GB RAM. He agreed.

    I would never have gotten the M1 Air otherwise, or the M2 Pro if I already had the M1 Air. It sucks that the Air couldn't just be upgraded with 16 GB since the M1 is as good for my usage as the M2 - I wouldn't even need the M2 Pro in that case.

    I haven't and will not sell my M1 Air though, since the M2 Pro is technically owned by the company that I work for. Selling my M1 Air would mean I'd have to get a new (or used, of course) computer if/when my employment come to an end. Feels nice to have a personal computer in case.

  • Dell XPS 7390 all the way. the CPU is not weak, only the base clock is. Each core turboes to 4.7 GHz if needed.

    The iGPU is much better than UHD 630 which is found in 8000 and 9000 series and can easily be used for light to medium gaming.

  • ArkasArkas Moderator

    the screen of the xps alone makes it worth it.

  • emghemgh Member

    @stefeman said: The iGPU is much better than UHD 630 which is found in 8000 and 9000 series and can easily be used for light to medium gaming.

    I really do see a point in being able to game when not at home, but I feel most situations limit the experience, right?

    It's still a hassle if you want a keyboard, a mouse, etc. Even just a laptop and a mouse takes room.

    Also, with the energy utilization of these laptops, combined with their main feature being portability, it's really not that portable if also having a power outlet nearby, right?

    Not trying to be overly disagreeable here. Just thinking out loud.

  • ariq01ariq01 Member

    whattt? 2 out of 8 slots used on laptop?

  • Two things I hate about the latitude 5k series are the docking stations (some model recommends getting the dual connector one, but it's too fragile) and the weight.

    I'd recommend the XPS.

  • emgemg Member

    @emgh said: Wtf do you guys do with your laptops? Research for the NSA?

    This is the key question. The problem with the responses above is that people are making recommendations based on their own use or how they perceive the OP would use the laptop.

    It would help if @Jasonhyperhost could tell us more about how he would use that laptop and what features are most important to them. Portability (size and weight)? Performance? Storage and RAM? The more we know about the laptop's intended use, the better the advice you will get.

    I treat laptops as moveable desktop machines. When I buy a laptop, I want the largest screen, lots of RAM, more cores, lots of storage (for virtual machines), etc. I care much less about its physical attributes like size and weight. I am usually near power, so battery life is less of a consideration for me. Through tricks and technique, I can stretch the battery life on those laptops for all day meetings by limiting activities to taking notes, and maybe peeking at email. Yes, I have carried very heavy 17 inch laptops all day all over the world.

    Honestly, the true "enabler" for larger laptops has been high quality backpack laptop cases. The only times I notice the weight is picking the backpack off the floor to put it on. Another enabler has been desktop "docks" that connect power, peripherals, network, etc. in one move. Docks at home and work can have full size quality keyboards and mice attached. I carry a mouse in the case too. The only time I use the touchpad is when the laptop is actually on my lap with no desk or table surface.

    (I was going to ask if anyone remembers those awful nipple pointers, but just learned that they are still being included with some laptops. Someone must like them.)

    Jason - How do you plan to use the laptop? Which features or capabilities are most important to you? That might help steer and improve the advice you get.

    Thanked by 1emgh
  • Congradulation. This is really dope laptop. WTF.

  • MikeAMikeA Member, Host Rep

    @desperand said:

    Congradulation. This is really dope laptop. WTF.

    Took me over 6 months to get the eGPU and had to buy it from Japan, but it's the best combo I've ever used.

  • @emg said: I treat laptops as moveable desktop machines. When I buy a laptop, I want the largest screen, lots of RAM, more cores, lots of storage (for virtual machines), etc. I care much less about its physical attributes like size and weight. I am usually near power, so battery life is less of a consideration for me. Through tricks and technique, I can stretch the battery life on those laptops for all day meetings by limiting activities to taking notes, and maybe peeking at email. Yes, I have carried very heavy 17 inch laptops all day all over the world.

    I agree with everything said in the post. But I just find this part interesting. Everyone has their own priorities and needs, and @OP definitely has not told us what specifically he wants to optimize for/look for and only gives information on spec. Which actually might show that OP only prioritizes what's inside the case instead of the entire package and that's fine.

    But there are various perspectives on approaching this. You can be fine with being tied to a wall with power and having a bigger screen, but a laptop's primary purpose is as a mobile computing device. Bigger than a phone, smaller than a desktop. Not being tied down to a wall means a lot (to me), so I end up making my mobile computing decisions based on it's dimensions, weight, and battery longevity. Also my usecase is different than many others. I have to either sit in to client meetings (so have to be presentable and not lug around a big device that'll be a distraction to others), might have some light computing/coding requirements, and has to have long battery life so that I can go through a few hours of meetings (basically power-intensive tasks of video and audio streaming) before I might have an opportunity to charge.

    Younger me has carried a 17 inch laptop around the world all day, but now... I don't need all that computing right this second.

    My current device list is a M1 Macbook Air with a thermal mod, Dell Latitude 5410 (current work laptop), and a Lenovo Thinkpad X1 Extreme.

    I love my thinkpad. It's a powerhouse workstation in a laptop form. I don't use it enough because the batteries don't last as long as I'd like for it to. It just naturally gets less usage. The M1 Macbook air just has better battery life and if I'm already carrying around two laptops then might as well have the second one be the lighter and smaller ones.

    C'est la vie.

    Thanked by 1emgh
  • emgemg Member
    edited October 7

    @HalfEatenPie said: You can be fine with being tied to a wall with power and having a bigger screen, but a laptop's primary purpose is as a mobile computing device.

    Responding:
    Good point. My laptop is really a desktop computer wannabe that I can take to customer sites or on travel, in places where I may be working for a few days or weeks. I use batteries more than you might think, but more for convenience. Even then, power is usually available when needed.

    You are correct that my use cases do not include being at the beach or poolside, sipping mint juleps while I work. :-)

    In case it helps, Apple Macs generally have better battery lifetimes than competing laptops based on my experience with both. CPU power utilization was one of the driving forces behind Apple's move away from Intel.

    Thanked by 1HalfEatenPie
  • Well I'm definitely not sipping mint juleps by the pool during work but I also don't look into being next to a plug every other hour.

    But that's fair. Honestly as long as your laptop can be off the power for about 4 hours then you're pretty much set for the day, especially if you're at a client site.

    I think Apple has put more thought and care into the little nuances of user management and experience. You can talk crap about their locked-in ecosystem (and I agree), but (as an example) they've factored in the battery degradation over time and have tuned their hardware to decrease the amount of power consumed by the CPU over-time to stay within those time-metrics makes a lot of sense to me. Granted they pushed that a bit too hard with their iPhone "battery scandal" but I think the intended purpose makes a lot of sense to me. I have yet to see any laptop manufacturer spend that much time and care building those kinds of experiences into a Windows-based laptop.

    Their transition away from Intel just made sense because they were limited in how much they could control battery power usage by locking themselves into Intel. So by leaving Intel and building their own "Apple Silicon", it gave them more ability to control power consumption factors.

    Thanked by 1emg
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