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can a consumer grade SSD be enough for a 10Gbit port?
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can a consumer grade SSD be enough for a 10Gbit port?

donkodonko Member

I am thinking to buy a dedicated server, the provider includes 10Gbit port, SSD (2TB, 960GB).

My question is if with these SSDs (which definetly are not enterprise) i can be able to use at least 80% of port speed, since i read most consumer SSDs (adata,kingston) writes at 500MB max, 4 Gbit will be my limit?

server doesn't have RAID, usage it's for download/upload files of 2gb constantly

probably i already answered myself but i need to confirm

Comments

  • Adam1Adam1 Member
    edited September 24

    I'm guessing you're conflating consumer with SATA, but it's possible and likely it's NVMe in 2021. But if you're certain it's SATA...

    You can squeeze about 550MB/s out of a SATA3 SSD, so about half of your 10Gbit ports throughput. You may achieve higher with compression, i.e. most of your data is plaintext. but 550MB/s is optimised, if you're doing 4K writes etc expect much less.

    You could also dedicate some RAM for additional buffering, so you could saturate your 10gbit by doing NIC > RAM > SSD; but I dont know how you'd set that up tbh, and it wouldnt be effective if theres no time between uploads.

    Of course, if it's an NVMe drive in there, then it's likely it will almost certainly be able to saturate your 10gbit port, with even low end drives being able to sustain > 1GB/s

    Thanked by 1donko
  • Best to get NVMe but if you are stuck with SSDs, go for RAID 0 assuming that you just need the speed and not sensitive data.

    signature for rent - ^_^

  • Even HDD can be enough for 10Gbit port as long as you send data from RAM lol

    It all depends what you do. If you're torrenting and you constantly sending same blocks then they are in memory (RAM).

    Thanked by 1donko

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  • ehhthingehhthing Member
    edited September 24

    At those speeds I'm not sure if the bottleneck will be your storage medium. Encrypting stuff (assuming you're transferring over TLS) at 10gbps isn't exactly trivial for a CPU.

  • @donko said:
    I am thinking to buy a dedicated server, the provider includes 10Gbit port, SSD (2TB, 960GB).

    My question is if with these SSDs (which definetly are not enterprise) i can be able to use at least 80% of port speed, since i read most consumer SSDs (adata,kingston) writes at 500MB max, 4 Gbit will be my limit?

    Is this not self answering, 4Gbps is not 80% of 10Gbps.

    In addition, the max numbers are obtained with large files, not many small files.

  • Daniel15Daniel15 Member
    edited September 25

    Which consumer SSDs? The Samsung 980 Pro NVMe SSD in my desktop PC is technically a "consumer-grade SSD" (it's in the consumer section on Samsung's site: https://www.samsung.com/semiconductor/minisite/ssd/product/consumer/980pro/) but it can easily do 7000 MB/s read if the motherboard has a PCIe 4.0 m.2 slot.

    Do you mean a low-end consumer SSD (SATA, < 1TB, lower-tier brands)?

  • @Daniel15 said: Do you mean a low-end consumer SSD (SATA, < 1TB, lower-tier brands)?

    yes

    @TimboJones said: the max numbers are obtained with large files, not many small files

    even with parallel downloads?

  • @donko said:

    @Daniel15 said: Do you mean a low-end consumer SSD (SATA, < 1TB, lower-tier brands)?

    yes

    @TimboJones said: the max numbers are obtained with large files, not many small files

    even with parallel downloads?

    Yes, increased overhead.

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