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Virtual audio device to get RDP sound on Windows Server ?
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Virtual audio device to get RDP sound on Windows Server ?

Hi, can someone guide with steps how to get sound support via RDP on a dedicated server without a sound card, running Windows Server. I’m totally rookie about it. The first time I heard of this possibility was yesterday, following an answer from the support of Vultr. I’m now wondering how realistic it is to rely on it ? How to install it and can it work with all softwares ?

—————-

“ It's feasible with virtualized audio solutions and/or an appropriate sound server program, but this is outside the scope of our support. The information below might help you get started on investigating this.

[ Windows VPS Sound ]

VPS instances are virtual machines running on host nodes (physical servers). There is no sound card installed in our servers, not even as a built-in motherboard chip. Even if there were, virtual machines would have no access to it for security reasons (all devices are virtualized).

You don't need a physical sound card to stream, capture, or process audio data. You may need to install and configure a virtual audio device in the guest operating system if your application(s) expects one to exist. Alternatively, it is possible to do audio work with some sound services (daemons), though the application must have support for this. They typically provide functions to aid in easier network transit for audio streams as well.

For Windows, the first task you should try is enabling the Windows Audio service and see if this changes anything. The link at https://www.vultr.com/docs/enable-windows-audio-on-a-windows-server-instance explains how to check and start this service.

Software installation, configuration, and maintenance is customer-managed on our platform, so you should research the available solutions for this task based on your specific requirements. To get started, it makes sense to start with looking at what audio I/O and transfer capabilities your intended application(s) have, which would be explained in their upstream documentation. From that, you can figure out what needs to be modified in the guest operating system to make this work.”

Comments

  • In kvm just install virtio driver and enable windows audio like that.
    Can you try enable windows audio?

    Thanked by 1Viro_Major
  • AlbaHostAlbaHost Member, Provider

    I don't know which virtualization does vultr use but this helped us when we were on xen virtualization:

    Start -> Run -> mmc.exe
    File -> Add/Remove Snap-In
    Choose "Group Policy Object Editor" from the list and click "Add >"
    Keep the Group Policy Object set to "Local Computer" and Click Finish and Click on OK
    Navigate to:
    Local Computer Policy

    • Computer Configuration
    • Administrative Templates
    • Windows Components
    • Remote Desktop Services
    • Remote Desktop Session Host
    • Device and Resource Redirection
    • Set "Allow Audio and Video playback redirection" to Enabled

    Hope it helps...

    Thanked by 1Viro_Major
  • @youandri said:
    In kvm just install virtio driver and enable windows audio like that.
    Can you try enable windows audio?

    You can enable Windows Audio but you still won't have any output devices out of the box.

    @Viro_Major said:

    Windows' RDP implementation already exposes a virtual audio device as long as you connect with the Remote audio playback option, but this comes with the caveat that the audio stops when the RDP session disconnects.

    If you need something more persistent, you can use something like VB-Cable to get a virtual sound device. I once used a similar setup (Windows, OBS, VB-Cable) to stream remotely on Twitch and it worked quite well.

    Thanked by 1Viro_Major
  • Indeed. Use VB Audio Cable, Virtual Audio Cable or Breakaway Pipeline.

  • darkimmortaldarkimmortal Member
    edited January 1

    https://github.com/duncanthrax/scream

    Not sure if this is easy/possible to transport over internet/VPN, but you could use it for just the virtual sound card capability to facilitate audio continuing while not connected to RDP

  • snzsnz Member

    Any specific reason why you want windows sounds on your server?

  • seonyeseonye Member

    @snz said:
    Any specific reason why you want windows sounds on your server?

    Your question isn't the right one because he can use the server for VDI and there's so much possibility.

  • seonyeseonye Member

    @Viro_Major said:
    Hi, can someone guide with steps how to get sound support via RDP on a dedicated server without a sound card, running Windows Server. I’m totally rookie about it. The first time I heard of this possibility was yesterday, following an answer from the support of Vultr. I’m now wondering how realistic it is to rely on it ? How to install it and can it work with all softwares ?

    —————-

    “ It's feasible with virtualized audio solutions and/or an appropriate sound server program, but this is outside the scope of our support. The information below might help you get started on investigating this.

    [ Windows VPS Sound ]

    VPS instances are virtual machines running on host nodes (physical servers). There is no sound card installed in our servers, not even as a built-in motherboard chip. Even if there were, virtual machines would have no access to it for security reasons (all devices are virtualized).

    You don't need a physical sound card to stream, capture, or process audio data. You may need to install and configure a virtual audio device in the guest operating system if your application(s) expects one to exist. Alternatively, it is possible to do audio work with some sound services (daemons), though the application must have support for this. They typically provide functions to aid in easier network transit for audio streams as well.

    For Windows, the first task you should try is enabling the Windows Audio service and see if this changes anything. The link at https://www.vultr.com/docs/enable-windows-audio-on-a-windows-server-instance explains how to check and start this service.

    Software installation, configuration, and maintenance is customer-managed on our platform, so you should research the available solutions for this task based on your specific requirements. To get started, it makes sense to start with looking at what audio I/O and transfer capabilities your intended application(s) have, which would be explained in their upstream documentation. From that, you can figure out what needs to be modified in the guest operating system to make this work.”

    If you are using RDP, it is usually enabled by activating only the audio service.
    Other actions are required if the client is not a windows

    Thanked by 1youandri
  • @seonye said:

    @Viro_Major said:
    Hi, can someone guide with steps how to get sound support via RDP on a dedicated server without a sound card, running Windows Server. I’m totally rookie about it. The first time I heard of this possibility was yesterday, following an answer from the support of Vultr. I’m now wondering how realistic it is to rely on it ? How to install it and can it work with all softwares ?

    —————-

    “ It's feasible with virtualized audio solutions and/or an appropriate sound server program, but this is outside the scope of our support. The information below might help you get started on investigating this.

    [ Windows VPS Sound ]

    VPS instances are virtual machines running on host nodes (physical servers). There is no sound card installed in our servers, not even as a built-in motherboard chip. Even if there were, virtual machines would have no access to it for security reasons (all devices are virtualized).

    You don't need a physical sound card to stream, capture, or process audio data. You may need to install and configure a virtual audio device in the guest operating system if your application(s) expects one to exist. Alternatively, it is possible to do audio work with some sound services (daemons), though the application must have support for this. They typically provide functions to aid in easier network transit for audio streams as well.

    For Windows, the first task you should try is enabling the Windows Audio service and see if this changes anything. The link at https://www.vultr.com/docs/enable-windows-audio-on-a-windows-server-instance explains how to check and start this service.

    Software installation, configuration, and maintenance is customer-managed on our platform, so you should research the available solutions for this task based on your specific requirements. To get started, it makes sense to start with looking at what audio I/O and transfer capabilities your intended application(s) have, which would be explained in their upstream documentation. From that, you can figure out what needs to be modified in the guest operating system to make this work.”

    If you are using RDP, it is usually enabled by activating only the audio service.
    Other actions are required if the client is not a windows

    Just wondering, what the actions for not windows? :smile:

  • seonyeseonye Member

    @youandri said:

    @seonye said:

    @Viro_Major said:
    Hi, can someone guide with steps how to get sound support via RDP on a dedicated server without a sound card, running Windows Server. I’m totally rookie about it. The first time I heard of this possibility was yesterday, following an answer from the support of Vultr. I’m now wondering how realistic it is to rely on it ? How to install it and can it work with all softwares ?

    —————-

    “ It's feasible with virtualized audio solutions and/or an appropriate sound server program, but this is outside the scope of our support. The information below might help you get started on investigating this.

    [ Windows VPS Sound ]

    VPS instances are virtual machines running on host nodes (physical servers). There is no sound card installed in our servers, not even as a built-in motherboard chip. Even if there were, virtual machines would have no access to it for security reasons (all devices are virtualized).

    You don't need a physical sound card to stream, capture, or process audio data. You may need to install and configure a virtual audio device in the guest operating system if your application(s) expects one to exist. Alternatively, it is possible to do audio work with some sound services (daemons), though the application must have support for this. They typically provide functions to aid in easier network transit for audio streams as well.

    For Windows, the first task you should try is enabling the Windows Audio service and see if this changes anything. The link at https://www.vultr.com/docs/enable-windows-audio-on-a-windows-server-instance explains how to check and start this service.

    Software installation, configuration, and maintenance is customer-managed on our platform, so you should research the available solutions for this task based on your specific requirements. To get started, it makes sense to start with looking at what audio I/O and transfer capabilities your intended application(s) have, which would be explained in their upstream documentation. From that, you can figure out what needs to be modified in the guest operating system to make this work.”

    If you are using RDP, it is usually enabled by activating only the audio service.
    Other actions are required if the client is not a windows

    Just wondering, what the actions for not windows? :smile:

    Clients OS :)

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