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get static IPv6 address space
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get static IPv6 address space

melanmelan Member
edited January 14 in General

currently my ISP provides only dynamic IPv6 address space (2402:4000:XXXX:YYYY/64), so my hosts cannot accessible without DDNS support.

is it technically possible me to get own PA or PI space and configure static IPv6 addresses to my hosts

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Comments

  • WSSWSS Member

    Yeah.

    You can always get a /64 or /48 from a HE.NET tunnel. That's static.

    I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

    Thanked by 1Aidan
  • melanmelan Member

    @WSS said: Yeah.

    You can always get a /64 or /48 from a HE.NET tunnel. That's static.

    Thanks, I've tried he.net also, but seems it requires public static IPv4 address as endpoint, My ISP only provides dynamic private IPv4 address...

    may be a stupid question, is there anything else than IPv6 over IPv4?

  • WSSWSS Member

    Other than native IPv6? Depends on if you can write it.

    I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

  • melanmelan Member

    @WSS said: Other than native IPv6? Depends on if you can write it.

    I am very new to IPv6 and networking... I mean is there any technology other than using a 6to4 tunnel? such as create a ipv6toipv6 tunnel dynamically and getting static IPv6's to my hosts

  • shellshell Member
    edited January 14

    @melan said: Thanks, I've tried he.net also, but seems it requires public static IPv4 address as endpoint, My ISP only provides dynamic private IPv4 address...

    may be a stupid question, is there anything else than IPv6 over IPv4?

    it's possible with dinamic public ipv4.
    https://ipv6.he.net/certification/faq.php

            My IPv4 endpoint address is dynamic. Can I still create a tunnel? If yes, what do I need to do when my IP address changes?
            Yes, you can still create a tunnel even if you are using a dynamic IPv4 endpoint address. If your IPv4 endpoint address changes, you can either login to the tunnelbroker.net page and update your IPv4 endpoint address or use https://ipv4.tunnelbroker.net/nic/update which is designed to be used to update your IPv4 endpoint address.
    
  • WSSWSS Member

    There's a way to route it to you without tunneling, but since you're stuck with a dynamic IP, you're going to have to set it up to do so on your side to initiate the connection.

    Look for IPv6 tunnel over IPv6. This is out of date, but it's still useful: https://linux-hacks.blogspot.com/2008/02/howto-ipv6-ipv6-tunnel-and-ip4-ipv6.html

    I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

  • melanmelan Member

    @shell said:

    @melan said: Thanks, I've tried he.net also, but seems it requires public static IPv4 address as endpoint, My ISP only provides dynamic private IPv4 address...

    may be a stupid question, is there anything else than IPv6 over IPv4?

    it's possible with dinamic public ipv4.
    https://ipv6.he.net/certification/faq.php

            My IPv4 endpoint address is dynamic. Can I still create a tunnel? If yes, what do I need to do when my IP address changes?
            Yes, you can still create a tunnel even if you are using a dynamic IPv4 endpoint address. If your IPv4 endpoint address changes, you can either login to the tunnelbroker.net page and update your IPv4 endpoint address or use https://ipv4.tunnelbroker.net/nic/update which is designed to be used to update your IPv4 endpoint address.
    

    Thanks.. My ISP provides me private IP (CGN range) and asked $35/month for public IP.. I'll get a public IP from ISP if there's no other option.

  • melanmelan Member

    @WSS said: There's a way to route it to you without tunneling, but since you're stuck with a dynamic IP, you're going to have to set it up to do so on your side to initiate the connection.

    Look for IPv6 tunnel over IPv6. This is out of date, but it's still useful: https://linux-hacks.blogspot.com/2008/02/howto-ipv6-ipv6-tunnel-and-ip4-ipv6.html

    Thanks.. I think this is what I looked for....

  • rm_rm_ Member

    You can get a VPS or dedicated server with an IPv6 subnet included, then tunnel that subnet over any VPN (such as OpenVPN or Tinc), routing it to your home.

    Don't worry 144 ms is fine for Heavy monsoon

    Thanked by 1yomero
  • @WSS said: There's a way to route it to you without tunneling

    How do you do that?

  • WSSWSS Member

    @sanvit said:

    @WSS said: There's a way to route it to you without tunneling

    How do you do that?

    You route it. Srsly. You get someone to send it to you somewhere static, and then you send it on to yourself.

    I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

    Thanked by 1sanvit
  • freerangecloudfreerangecloud Member, Provider

    I have an IPv6 allocation from ARIN which is advertised out of a colo. I then route some subnets back to my house over an l2tp tunnel for assigning to devices on my local network. Using Mikrotik routers on both ends. Works pretty well and I haven't noticed any performance degradation (I'm only about 15ms away from the colo though).

    VPS, Shared Hosting, Routed Subnets and more - https://freerangecloud.com

    Thanked by 1melan
  • malekmalek Member

    @freeerangecloud said: I have an IPv6 allocation from ARIN which is advertised out of a colo. I then route some subnets back to my house over an l2tp tunnel for assigning to devices on my local network. Using Mikrotik routers on both ends. Works pretty well and I haven't noticed any performance degradation (I'm only about 15ms away from the colo though).

    Same here though I use VyOS and I advertise it from Vultr (BGP + custom ISO support).

    Thanked by 1melan
  • FHRFHR Member, Provider

    @sanvit said:

    @WSS said: There's a way to route it to you without tunneling

    How do you do that?

    IPTables DNAT

    Affordable Semi-Dedicated VPS - Enjoy the performance to the fullest extent. | 40% OFF promo

  • JanevskiJanevski Member
    edited January 17

    @WSS said:

    @sanvit said:

    @WSS said: There's a way to route it to you without tunneling

    How do you do that?

    You route it. Srsly. You get someone to send it to you somewhere static, and then you send it on to yourself.

    Basically, within the nearest datacenter you get a dedicated server with ipv6 and have the provider route an additional ipv6 subnet towards the server and enable routing on it. Then you get an amateur radio license and two radios. Next you connect the two radios one on the server sound modem and the other same, but at your home pc. Turn the rig on and assign an ipv6 on your server side ax0. If the MTU is too small, radvd won't work. If you cannot maintain a radio link, analog phone lines shall do just fine. GSM might work, but due to lossy audio codec compression i doubt you'll be able to achieve higher data rate modulation.

    Please note that this tutorial is for ipv4, but why not?

    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/AX25-HOWTO/x1194.html

    I hope i was extremely helpful.

    PS: If your provider uses DHCPv6 ask them for a static ip. If it's only radvd you're set, just don't change the mac.

    or

    Use Hurricane Electric at the moment it's the most affordable solution. Plus when you create a tunnel there are example shell commands that'll help you make a tunnel even if you don't know how.

    Thanked by 1melan
  • ClouviderClouvider Member, Provider
    edited January 17

    Modem ? GSM ? Radio ? Where do you live @Janevski :P?

    Clouvider Leading UK Cloud Hosting solution provider || UK Dedicated Servers Sale || Tasty KVM Slices || Latest LET Offer

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  • WSSWSS Member

    @Clouvider said: Modem ? GSM ? Radio ? Where do you live @Janevski :P?

    Somewhere that must eat their carrier pigeons these days.

    I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

  • ClouviderClouvider Member, Provider

    @Nekki I see what you did here with ignoring this one. : >

    Clouvider Leading UK Cloud Hosting solution provider || UK Dedicated Servers Sale || Tasty KVM Slices || Latest LET Offer

    Web hosting in Cloud | SSD & SAS True Cloud VPS on OnApp | Private Cloud | Dedicated Servers | Colocation | Managed Services

  • omelasomelas Member
    edited January 21

    he.net ipv6 tunnel has dynamic endpoint configration url. open it with currnet ip address and cron a wget on that url update url shows on advenced tab of (opened) tunnel detail. https://forums.he.net/index.php?topic=1994.0

    Thanked by 1MasonR
  • melanmelan Member

    @freeerangecloud said: I have an IPv6 allocation from ARIN which is advertised out of a colo. I then route some subnets back to my house over an l2tp tunnel for assigning to devices on my local network. Using Mikrotik routers on both ends. Works pretty well and I haven't noticed any performance degradation (I'm only about 15ms away from the colo though).

    Could you please provide me some sample configuration ?

  • melanmelan Member
    edited January 22

    @Janevski said:

    @WSS said:

    @sanvit said:

    @WSS said: There's a way to route it to you without tunneling

    How do you do that?

    You route it. Srsly. You get someone to send it to you somewhere static, and then you send it on to yourself.

    Basically, within the nearest datacenter you get a dedicated server with ipv6 and have the provider route an additional ipv6 subnet towards the server and enable routing on it. Then you get an amateur radio license and two radios. Next you connect the two radios one on the server sound modem and the other same, but at your home pc. Turn the rig on and assign an ipv6 on your server side ax0. If the MTU is too small, radvd won't work. If you cannot maintain a radio link, analog phone lines shall do just fine. GSM might work, but due to lossy audio codec compression i doubt you'll be able to achieve higher data rate modulation.

    Please note that this tutorial is for ipv4, but why not?

    http://www.tldp.org/HOWTO/AX25-HOWTO/x1194.html

    I hope i was extremely helpful.

    PS: If your provider uses DHCPv6 ask them for a static ip. If it's only radvd you're set, just don't change the mac.

    or

    Use Hurricane Electric at the moment it's the most affordable solution. Plus when you create a tunnel there are example shell commands that'll help you make a tunnel even if you don't know how.

    how can I determine provider uses DHCPv6 or radvd (I called provider, they have no idea about it and they said they have no plan to provide static for IPv6 )

    one of my host config as below ifconfig wlan0 wlan0 Link encap:Ethernet HWaddr 54:35::::
    inet addr:172.20.0.2 Bcast:172.20.0.255 Mask:255.255.255.0 inet6 addr: 2402:4000:XXXX:YYYY:5635:ff:fe:****/64 Scope:Global inet6 addr: fe80::5635:ff:fe:****/64 Scope:Link inet6 addr: 2402:4000:XXXX:YYYY::2/128 Scope:Global

    IPv6 gateway: FE80::5EF9:FF:FE:****/64

    ==router== IPv6 address: 2402:4000:XXXX:YYYY:5A2C:FF:FE:****/64

    XXXX and YYYY changes time to time(not change upon router restart)

    tried with Hurricane Electric but I am behind a CGN

  • WSSWSS Member

    Start with the synthesizer, add ThinkPad as necessary.

    I won't be back until @bsdguy is released.

  • freerangecloudfreerangecloud Member, Provider

    @melan said:

    @freeerangecloud said: I have an IPv6 allocation from ARIN which is advertised out of a colo. I then route some subnets back to my house over an l2tp tunnel for assigning to devices on my local network. Using Mikrotik routers on both ends. Works pretty well and I haven't noticed any performance degradation (I'm only about 15ms away from the colo though).

    Could you please provide me some sample configuration ?

    On Mikrotik RouterOS it's pretty easy. Basically you create an L2TP Server on the datacenter end, you create an L2TP client on the home router. Assign IPv6 addresses (in the same subnet) to the L2TP Interface on both ends. Then you create a static route on the datacenter router pointed to the L2TP IPv6 address of your home router. Assign an address from the routed subnet to the LAN interface on the home router, create a default IPv6 route on the home router to point to the L2TP IPv6 address.

    If you want specific configuration commands for RouterOS I can probably look them up.

    VPS, Shared Hosting, Routed Subnets and more - https://freerangecloud.com

    Thanked by 1melan
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